My Autodesk

Client: 
Autodesk
Role: 
Interaction Designer
Methods: 
Concept Design, Storyboards, Flows, Site Maps, Use Cases, Wireframes, Mockups
Summary: 
User Experience lead on the Customer Engagement Platform team designing a new customer facing web application to allow individuals and enterprise companies to manage their Autodesk software and services.

Illustrations by my super talented Autodesk colleague Bryan Young.

Yahoo! Pulse Settings Redesign

Client: 
Yahoo!
Role: 
Interaction Designer
Methods: 
Concept Design, Wireframes
Summary: 
Redesign of settings for Pulse, Yahoo's social updates product including user settings related to privacy.

Pulse is a Yahoo! social site where users can post status messages and consume status messages and activity feeds from Yahoo and other social networking sites. The product was pushed to market on an aggressive timeline. Settings for privacy, updates and notifications were released as a confusing mix of overlays and disconnected pages. As the lead Interaction Designer I worked with my design team to overhaul the user experience of the settings, particularly users privacy settings. We created a very simple, overall page for privacy settings with links to more granular, custom settings. For activity feeds we combined what had been released as two pages into one page allowing users to add and permission activity feeds to their stream in one seamless interaction. For multi-channel notifications we changed the design pattern from check boxes to push buttons to better communicate state and accommodate touch devices such as tablets.

Results: 
The final deliverable was a set of HTML/Javascript prototypes. We took advantage of HTML5/CSS3 technologies with creative in-page animations and inline validation.

Yahoo! User Generated Translation Platform

Client: 
Yahoo!
Role: 
Interaction Designer
Methods: 
Concept Design, Sketches, Storyboards, Wireframes, Visual Design
Summary: 
Led design of a user generated translation platform that would allow users of flickr and other Yahoo! properties to translate products into their own language.

It is expensive and time consuming to localize web properties into different languages. Yahoo's globalization team built a platform for users to translate properties themselves as a community. Previous design work had been done on the project resulting in a Firebug like UI. I was assigned to the project, changing the UI so it was more friendly and effective for translating in-context. The thought was that the better we could show the text string in-context, the better the translation would be. I hand drew screens and incorporated them into a storyboard with personas. I created flow maps to understand how a user would move through the words and pages she translated. Light game mechanics were applied to get users continuing to translate string after string and page after page.

Results: 
Delivered comprehensive documentation specifying the interaction and visual design of the platform.

ktalk: an online community for young adults with chronic kidney disease

Client: 
National Kidney Foundation of Michigan
Role: 
Site Designer
Methods: 
Mind Mapping, Personas & Scenarios, Wireframes, Mockups, Visual Design, Drupal
Summary: 
Designed and built an online support community for young adults with chronic kidney disease.

Young adults with chronic kidney disease struggle with anger, depression and feelings of isolation coping with an illness that is most common among the elderly. The National Kidney Foundation of Michigan (NKFM) has a successful peer mentoring program to help young adults and reached out to researchers at the University of Michigan School of Information to expand this program into an online support community. To kick-off the project I led an IDEO-style deep dive brainstorming session with peer mentors, NKFM administrators, and the research team. From this session I created a site concept document with site goals and characteristics, personas & scenarios, information architecture, and wireframes. With feedback from this document I significantly scaled back the sites’ features developing a final set of mockups as well as the site’s community guidelines and management plan. The site was built in Drupal by myself and 3 programmers using a modified Agile development process.

Results: 
The site went live to peer mentors and participating young adults on February 20th. Members are actively participating in the site. One member changed dialysis methods based on another member's recommendation. A paper on project was presented at the 2010 American Medical Informatics Association Annual Symposium.

MIFresh: A kiosk system to promote local produce consumption

Client: 
2009 CHI Student Design Competition
Role: 
User Experience Designer
Methods: 
Contextual Inquiry, Affinity Diagramming, Personas & Scenarios, Storyboarding, Prototyping, Usability Testing
Summary: 
MIFresh is a prototype system consisting of public displays and interactive kiosks in grocery stores in Detroit that aims to create sustained demand for local produce.

I led a comprehensive contextual inquiry process to understand Detroit’s existing food system, interviewing approximately 34 stakeholders and conducting observations at local grocery stores, farmer’s markets, and a food delivery service. Our team discovered that low consumer demand for fresh local produce was the greatest obstacle to increasing consumption of Michigan grown fruits and vegetables and that the ideal location for an intervention was the local grocery store. Through storyboards and sketches we designed a Flash prototype for MIFresh, a shopping intervention system consisting of a wall-mounted large display and multiple kiosk terminals. The public display provides local food awareness, education and important instructions to promote customer interaction with the individual kiosks. The kiosks promote the purchase of local produce by utilizing familiar shopping features such as coupons and rewards programs. We tested a hi-fi prototype of the system with 5 grocery shoppers in Detroit and received positive feedback from all participants. For more information view the poster we presented at CHI.

Results: 
Our team won 2nd place in the Computer-Human Interaction (CHI) 2009 Student Design Competition.

Animation Station: Building an input device with Arduino

Client: 
PLAY
Role: 
Product Designer
Methods: 
Sketches, Sketch Models, Full-scale Model, Laser Cutting, Processing, Arduino, Soldering
Summary: 
Designed and built a prototype input device for a stop-motion animation workstation.

The Animation Station is a portable, easy-to-use workstation that allows people create short stop-motion animations. The original creators of the station approached our industrial design class for help designing the next iteration of the workstation. We began by using the station ourselves and documenting various usability problems. From information gathered from stakeholders on the project we focused on making our design kid-friendly, durable, and easy to transport. I drew sketches, created sketch models, and collaborated on a full-scale cardboard model of our team’s design. As the team moved towards building a working prototype I focused on creating the input device for the station. In previous iterations the users controlled the custom stop-animation software using a mouse. During testing we found the mouse to be problematic for many reasons, in particular, it took the users attention away from the animation space to the software interface. After many proposals the group decided on a simple button interface. I used a laser cutter to create the buttons and box from acrylic. Force sensing resistors below the buttons feed input to an Arduino board which communicates with the software over the serial port and also activates LED lights for visual feedback on button presses.

Results: 
Testing of the full-scale prototype and input device was completed in the summer of 2009.
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